Morven Kitchen Garden

Garden Overview
Located on a one-acre plot which was once organically cultivated for John Kluge, the Morven Kitchen Garden offers a hands-on learning opportunity to study food production cycles, design sustainable agriculture technologies, and develop a better understanding of the social, environmental, and economic implications of our daily food choices. The Morven Kitchen Garden was initiated by students, for students, and it serves both the University and greater Charlottesville community as a site for learning and growing. For weekly updates from the Kitchen Garden, check out our blog.

CSA Program
The Morven Kitchen Garden offers a unique CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) program offered exclusively to UVA students, faculty, and staff. Weekly CSA shares are available on a monthly basis from May until October, in which a box of fresh produce and recipe book is dropped off each week on grounds.

Student Research
A central focus of the Morven Kitchen Garden is to support independent student research. The garden serves as a living laboratory to explore questions surrounding farm economics, organic cultivation techniques, and place-based educational practices.

Three independent study projects are currently underway in the garden:

• Season Extension - in partnership with the Local Food Hub, 4th year Engineering student, Rowan Sprague, is studying the effectiveness and financial costs/benefits of different methods for extending the growing season into the colder months.

• Educational Programming – in partnership with the Charlottesville City Schoolyard Garden project, 3rd year Urban and Environmental Planning student, Libby Lyon, is developing curriculum for edible schoolyard gardens and are working to create a program at UVA’s Madison House which would train UVA students to help establish and maintain schoolyard gardens throughout local schools.

• Bee-keeping – through the establishment of six bee hives just outside the Kitchen Garden, 4th year Engineering Student, Rowan Sprague, is experimenting analyzing different means of preventing invasive pests from entering the hives as well as studying the effects of pesticide drift from neighboring fields.

If you are interested in one of those ongoing projects, or would like to use the garden for an individual research initiative, please contact Michelle Rehme (mrr5q@virginia.edu).

Click on the cover below to read the 2011 State of the Garden Report:


Want to get your hands dirty and visit the garden? Send an email to .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)